The 1001 Tales of Indiana Josh

Anonymous asked: Whats difference between normal taa and taa marbuta

The normal taa is often referred to as the taa maftuHa (تاء مفتوحة, “open taa”) to differentiate it from the taa marbuTa (تاء مربوطة, “tied up taa”), which is used to mark feminine gender for nouns/verbs at the end of words. Its final sound is /-a/ except for when it’s part of an iDafa (genitive) construct and the final /t/ is pronounced along with the /a/ so that you get /-at/.‎ 

Note that the taa marbuta is not a separate letter of the alphabet, but rather just a variation on the normal letter taa, or taa maftuHafor the purposes of marking the above distinctions in Arabic.

bikes-n-girls:

Monica Bellucci

paging bb

bikes-n-girls:

Monica Bellucci

paging bb

Evans, also meant to point out (I’m currently on the road and on my phone so I’m a bit scattered at the moment) that, like, technically that dudebro’s tattoo isn’t really grammatically correct even if the letters were properly connected. He really needs to use a definite noun-adjective phrase, rather than an adverbial, so that it would read: السعادة الدائم or السعادة الابدية (this one being probably the better translation)

sixfacesofevans:

I am cackling forever at this dumb piece of shit. I’m assuming he wanted it to say “السعادت دائماً” which means something like “eternal happiness” (right, indianajosh?) but failed. Failed miserably.

Hahaha yeah, poor pathetic little shit. I don’t even feel bad for him.And you just about nailed it with the Arabic, the only thing being that the word for “happiness” should end with a taa marbuta, instead: السعادة

sixfacesofevans:

I am cackling forever at this dumb piece of shit. I’m assuming he wanted it to say “السعادت دائماً” which means something like “eternal happiness” (right, indianajosh?) but failed. Failed miserably.

Hahaha yeah, poor pathetic little shit. I don’t even feel bad for him.

And you just about nailed it with the Arabic, the only thing being that the word for “happiness” should end with a taa marbuta, instead: السعادة

portrait of teh blogger w/sad face :(

portrait of teh blogger w/sad face :(

streamofcuntsciousness replied to your post “saroshig replied to your post:You seem to like this movie a lot. Seen…”

I’m all the other cool things about Canada, obv

the other cool thing, yes

Forget Atwood, he’s my national treasure.

yeah, basically, one of the coolest things about canada, tbh

nnilkshake:

life hack: make out with me

(Source: nnilkshake)

Anonymous asked: I also like a line from this book which i got to know through you which is ' All I ever wanted was a world without maps".

That’s actually a line from Minghella’s adapted screenplay. The full quote, from the book (which appears at the end of the middle paragraph below), is one of my favorite passages:

It is important to die in holy places. That was one of the secrets of the desert…When I turned her around, her whole body was covered in bright pigment. Herbs and stones and light and the ash of acacia to make her eternal. The body pressed against sacred colour. Only the blue eye removed, made anonymous, a naked map where nothing is depicted, no signature of lake, no dark cluster of mountain, no lime-green fan where the Nile rivers enter the open palm of Alexandria, the edge of Africa.

And all the names of the tribes, the nomads of faith who walked in the monotone of the desert and saw brightness and faith and colour…We die containing a richness of lovers and tribes, tastes we have swallowed, bodies we have plunged into and swum up as if rivers of wisdom, characters we have climbed into as if trees, fears we have hidden in as if caves. I wish for all this to be marked on my body when I am dead. I believe in such cartography—to be marked by nature, not just to label ourselves on a map like the names of rich men and women on buildings. We are communal histories, communal books. We are not owned or monogamous in our taste or experience. All I desired was to walk upon such an earth that had no maps.

I carried Katharine Clifton into the desert, where there is the communal book of moonlight. We were among the rumour of wells. In the palace of winds.

The whole book, like all of Ondaatje’s writing, is marked with really evocative passages like the above. His overall writing is quite poetic and sensual, but often eclipsed by a very dense historical analog that (to me, anyways) actually helps make his use of poetry all the more powerful.

Anonymous asked: You seem to like this movie a lot. Seen many reblogs from it. I'm thinking of watching it soon.

Where’d you get that idea?

To be honest, it’s actually the book that I really like. And Michael Ondaatje’s writing, in general. But I thought Anthony Minghella did a pretty wonderful job translating the book into film, capped off by gorgeous cinematography, a really great cast with solid performances, and a pretty nice score from Gabriel Yared. So yeah, I do like the movie quite a bit, but it’s really the book that I revisit and think of the most.